Septoplasty is a surgical procedure in which the nasal septum is straightened.

What is the nasal septum?
The nasal septum is the part of the nose that divides the right and left nasal cavities. It usually lies directly in the center of the nose and rests on a bony ridge called the maxillary crest. Part of the septum in the front of the nose is made up of cartilage. Towards the back, the septum is made up of thin bone.

The basic principle in a septoplasty is to straighten the crooked portions of the septum. The operation is almost always done through the nose, without an external incision (there may be an incision if a rhinoplasty is also done at the same time).  At the end of the procedure, nasal splints are placed on both sides of the septum to prevent blood clot formation. The splints will be removed 1 week after the operation.

Who needs the operation?
People who have nasal obstruction with deviated nasal septum
Obstruction of sinus opening leading to sinusitis
Epistaxis and septal spur headache needs the surgery.

Why having the operation?
Reduce nasal obstruction
Reduce obstruction of sinus opening leading to sinusitis
Reduce epistaxis
Reduce septal spur headache

What are the potential complications of a septoplasty?
Bleeding is a possible risk, which may require nasal packing. Much more rare is the risk of a hole developing in the septum after the operation. This may cause nasal crusting or interfere with breathing through the nose.



Kevin Ki-Hong Ho, MD
San Francisco
Ear, Nose & Throat Specialist

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Golden Gate ENT
Kevin Ki-Hong Ho, MD
San Francisco
Ear, Nose & Throat Specialist

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Kevin Ki-Hong Ho, MD
San Francisco
Ear, Nose & Throat Specialist
415-682-8181